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The Truth About Vertical Jump Training

The best way to increase your vertical leap seems to have become a sort of mystery these days; athletes wonder why the guy with really skinny legs can jump high, as well as the really muscular one with thick legs; they wonder why jumping off one leg is so much easier for some and more difficult for others; they wonder why so many workouts can yield so little results.

Author: Daniel Back

The best way to increase your vertical leap seems to have become a sort of mystery these days; athletes wonder why the guy with really skinny legs can jump high, as well as the really muscular one with thick legs; they wonder why jumping off one leg is so much easier for some and more difficult for others; they wonder why so many workouts can yield so little results. 

Unknowing athletes are vulnerable to poor information supplied by the ease of publication on the internet. One kid had using a stairclimber as part of his jump training; another wanted to know how long it would be before he could dunk if he jumped rope every day; a 5'7" 13 year old girl wanted to dunk before high school; the list of the poorly informed goes on and on. This mystery status of vertical jump training has led to a tendency to seek out new, revolutionary exercises and products; a mystery has to have a crazy answer, right? Thus, we see bizarre products like calf isolators, jumpsoles, and vertimax, and there are plenty of programs offering "revolutionary training" from "vertical jump experts."

There is also a gravitation towards less familiar, less traditional exercises. Many athletes learn about plyometrics and think that this different type of training which is specific to jumping must be the answer. It makes so much sense when a person first hears about fast and slow muscle contraction to only train with plyometric drills. Or there is the opposite opinion that squats and power lifts are the only thing needed for an exceptional vertical. Supporters of this opinion base it on the fact that world class olympic lifters often have verticals of 36 inches or more. 

My goal is to eliminate the confusion with simple, factual information.The truth is that every athlete is different and will need to do training that fits his or her individual abilities. Many people are looking for one magical workout or even one exercise that will make them a superstar. That's not the way it works; things are a little more complicated than that. However, if you understand some things about the human body, it can be easy to create an intelligent and effective training plan. 

I began sharing what I've learned with whoever I can, because I am yet to find a complete, accurate source of information available for all. Everyone wants money for their "secret breakthrough formula." Quality jump training is not a secret or a mystery, and I do not believe an athlete should have to pay $40 for a list of exercises and a chart of numbers. I hope to equip you with knowledge that will help you train intelligently for the rest of your life. Yes, I do have vertical jump training programs and exercise videos available for free, but I also want you to understand the science behind the training.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/basketball-articles/the-truth-about-vertical-jump-training-1346864.html
About the AuthorDaniel Back is an aspiring athlete and trainer. He has personally reached a 43-inch vertical and created a site called Free to Fly, so he can help others increase their athleticism as well. 

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